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Expiry date:
25 Nov 2018
Location:
Nationwide

Teach English in Spain – Start in January

Meddeas

Teach English in Spain in September with Meddeas, which offers paid yearlong positions in different schools in Spain.

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Expiry date:
25 Nov 2018
Location:
Nationwide
Job type:
Work placement
Contract type:
Contract
Industry:
Admin, Advertising, Marketing, Business management, Catering, Volunteering, Interiors, Publishing, Performing Arts, Biomedical engineering, Aeronautical engineering, Automotive engineering, Chemical engineering, Civil engineering, Electrical engineering, Electronic engineering, Manufacturing, Mechanical engineering, Nuclear engineering, Software engineering, Alcohol industry, Banking, Finance, Insurance & pensions, Nursing, Medicine, Veterinary science, Legal Administration, Surveying, Town planning, Buying, Fitness instruction, Maintenance, Teaching, Building, Plumbing, Funeral industry, Admin
Expiry date:
20 Dec 2018
Location:
Cardiff, South Glamorgan

HR Internship

Vauxhall Finance

About the role We have a new opportunity for a 12 month internship as a Human Resources (HR) Intern from November 2018 until October 2019 in a busy HR team. This is a great opportunity to not only learn about the HR function but to be part of a European c

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Expiry date:
20 Dec 2018
Location:
Cardiff, South Glamorgan
Job type:
Internship
Contract type:
Contract
Industry:
HR
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Helping you find a career in HR

HR stands for Human Resources. HR professionals are the people who look after the employees of an organisation. Their duties include finding the very best candidates and hiring them, or developing training and professional development plans for existing members of staff. They also intervene if there are any personal or legal issues that might happen in the workplace.

Consequently, HR can require a delicate touch. You’ll need to be compassionate and able to cope with difficult situations (for instance, you may need to make an employee redundant). Emotional intelligence is a must. You’ll also have to keep in mind the commercial goals of the business and balance these against employee needs. It can be a rewarding experience too, as you’ll get to solve employee problems and create a calmer, happier workplace.

HR incorporates many roles, including recruitment, learning and development, and Workplace Health and Safety (WHS). You’ll be the human face of the company for your employees, so a level of kindness and professionalism is required. HR sets the standard for employee behaviour, so in some regards the HR department should act as a role model for the rest of the company.

HR departments often run events to foster coordination in a company, so you’ll have plenty of opportunities to express yourself creatively.

Often, although not always, you’ll need a degree to get a permanent position in a HR department.


Skills & interests you'll need
One of the core goals of a HR team is to foster teamwork amongst employees, so skills in communication and team building are essential. You’ll need to be able to listen to others and take their concerns on board then effectively resolve any issues. Creative problem solving skills are therefore also a must.

A good amount of organisational skill is also required. As you move up through the industry, you’ll be given more responsibility, so you’ll be able to develop these skills further as you work.

Your personality is key. You need to be friendly and approachable. Patience will also be required.

Most roles in HR will require candidates with a bachelor’s degree, although they are unlikely to specify a specific degree subject. Business and humanities degrees can give you the skills you’ll need for a role in the industry. Often, companies will have graduate schemes which can be a great way to get your foot in the door.
- Ability to Work Under Pressure
- Adaptability
- Communication
- Diplomacy
- Organisation
- Presentation Skills
- Teamwork
- Verbal Communication
- Written Communication
How to get HR internships, work experience or placements
Any work experience in a similar kind of business to the company you’re applying to will go a long way. Demonstrate the kinds of skills you picked up there and how they can be applied to a role in HR.

As mentioned, you may need a degree of some kind, and graduate programs can give you some work experience that will help you get your foot in the door of the industry.

Further training will often be required. Things like health and safety or harassment guidelines will often change, so you’ll be required to be up to date on all the latest developments. Professional qualifications, which you can take whilst working, are run by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). Often, companies will support you in taking these courses.

Many larger businesses will offer a range of different work placement schemes in HR aimed at university students or sixth formers. These can range from a year-long, paid placement during your degree (a ‘sandwich year’ or industrial placement), to a summer internship (usually 2-3 months), to a short 2-3 weeks of work shadowing.

A ‘sandwich’ year is usually taken between the penultimate and final years of your degree course, and many people who undertake placements during their degrees report that the experience they received was highly beneficial for their career search after graduating (many employers will also give hiring preference in their graduate schemes to people who have completed placements with them and made a good impression!) Industrial placements can also be a great way to earn a year’s salary and ease students’ financial worries ahead of their final years. Most work placements are recruited during the first term of your penultimate year.

Many degree courses in business-related subjects will have a ‘sandwich year’ as part of the degree’s structure, so you might be able to find out details about placements in buying from your department. If you are particularly interested in a career in HR, it might also be worthwhile speaking to your university’s careers department to see whether they have links to particular businesses. Even if your degree does not have a ‘sandwich’ year in its structure, many universities will allow you to take a year out for a placement, so if you are interested in undertaking a placement, speak to your department.

Most summer internships and work experience programmes will be advertised on employers’ websites, so you should identify a range of businesses which interest you and look for details of various programmes. Most employers will expect summer intern to be going into their final year of a degree, while work experience programmes are aimed at college students.
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